Explore mythology and art with information about the classic stories of heroes and gods...from the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, to the legends of the Celts. Mythography presents resources and reference materials about mythology - including recommended books, and lexicons that explain Greek, Roman, and Celtic terms.

Gardner's Art Through the Ages

This book is the classic reference for the study of art. It features a history of artists and their works, as well as lucid and engaging descriptions of the styles and periods of art history. Highly recommended for both students and scholars.

Aphrodite in Art
Aphrodite in Myth
Art Themes












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Marsyas in Greek Mythology
The legend of Marsyas features a message that is important in Greek mythology. Indeed, the significance of the story can be summarized as follows: hubris, or excessive pride, will be punished by the gods. So let us now learn more about how - and why - Marsyas challenged an Olympian, and the consequences of this ill-advised action.

According to mythology, Marsyas was a satyr. Normally, satyrs are depicted as pleasure-loving creatures who haunt forests and other areas of natural beauty, and spend their time pursuing nymphs. However, this particular satyr was interested in entirely different diversions. It was said that Marsyas one day found a flute that the goddess Athena had discarded (Athena had herself invented the flute, but the lovely goddess decided that she looked ridiculous when she played it). Marsyas was intrigued by the flute. He soon learned to play the instrument, and in time became quite proficient.

Marsyas was so talented - not to mention proud of his musical abilities - that he felt compelled to challenge the god Apollo to a contest of skill. Now, remember that in Greek mythology, Apollo was the god of music. Apollo therefore represented the divine power of music, and challenging this god was, to say the least, a bit arrogant. But Marsyas was obviously overconfident.

The Muses judged this contest between a satyr and a god. Both Marsyas and Apollo played their respective instruments beautifully, but in the end, Apollo won. Because the rules of the challenge stated that the loser was at the mercy of the winner, Apollo was free to do whatever he liked to punish the poor satyr. And Apollo devised a gruesome punishment for the satyr's arrogance - he had Marsyas flayed alive. In his memory, the blood and tears of Marsyas and his friends formed a river that was named after him.




Who's Who in Classical Mythology

Who's Who in Classical Mythology

This book is a great source for information about Greek and Roman mythology! Organized alphabetically, this who's who features information about over 1200 of the most intriguing characters from Classical myth and legend.

Bulfinch's Mythology

Bulfinch's Mythology

The stories of Classical myth come to life in Bulfinch's book. This edition also features legends from other cultures.

Mythography Forums

Mythography Forums

Do you have a specific question about Greek, Roman, and Celtic mythology? Then try the Mythography forum!