Explore mythology and art with information about the classic stories of heroes and gods...from the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, to the legends of the Celts. Mythography presents resources and reference materials about mythology - including recommended books, and lexicons that explain Greek, Roman, and Celtic terms.

Gardner's Art Through the Ages

This book is the classic reference for the study of art. It features a history of artists and their works, as well as lucid and engaging descriptions of the styles and periods of art history. Highly recommended for both students and scholars.

Aphrodite in Art
Aphrodite in Myth
Art Themes












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Okeanos in Myth
In Greek mythology, Okeanos (Oceanus) was a Titan who personified the Ocean. He appears in the Theogony of Hesiod as the son of Gaia (the Earth) and Ouranos (the Sky).

The ancient poet Homer offers us an intriguing glimpse of the Ocean in the Iliad. In the lyrical description of the legendary shield of Achilles, Homer shows how the craftsman Hephaistos depicted Okeanos as a vast river that surrounds the world:

"Then, running round the shield-rim, triple-ply,
he pictured all the might of the Ocean stream."

As the god of the Ocean, Okeanos also was responsible for fathering many of the deities who in Greek myth either personified or inhabited the rivers, lakes, seas, and various other bodies of water. Okeanos, together with his consort Tethys, had many children, including the "three thousand slender-ankled daughters" who were known collectively as the Oceanids. In addition Okeanos and Tethys were the parents of the rivers and therefore the river gods.

Although Okeanos did not really play a prominent role in many legends, there is one intriguing story in which the god took part, and it involves the hero Herakles. According to the tale, Herakles borrowed a golden bowl from the Sun-god Helios in order to cross the wide expanse of the Ocean. However, once Herakles was on his way, Okeanos used his power to rock the golden bowl (and therefore also the hero) in the water. Herakles, in typical fashion, simply threatened Okeanos with violence. Okeanos quickly stopped interfering, and the great Greek hero continued on with his journey.




Who's Who in Classical Mythology

Who's Who in Classical Mythology

This book is a great source for information about Greek and Roman mythology! Organized alphabetically, this who's who features information about over 1200 of the most intriguing characters from Classical myth and legend.

Bulfinch's Mythology

Bulfinch's Mythology

The stories of Classical myth come to life in Bulfinch's book. This edition also features legends from other cultures.

Mythography Forums

Mythography Forums

Do you have a specific question about Greek, Roman, and Celtic mythology? Then try the Mythography forum!